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July Gardening Topics

2022


  • Collecting Leaf Samples to Plan Fertilizer Applications in Fruit and Pecan Crops - Becky Carroll, Associate Extension Specialist

    Although fertilizer applications are usually made in early Spring, July is the critical time to find out what your pecan, blackberry, peach, apple trees and grapevines really need.  Tissue analysis is a reliable management tool used to indicate the fertility needs of several fruit crops. Pecan, blackberry and fruit trees can be monitored by collecting leaf samples while grapevine monitoring requires collection of leaf petioles.

     

    Timing is critical. Sample pecan and tree fruits during July, blackberries after harvest, and grapes at veraison (berry color change).  Pecan and fruit tree leaf samples are collected according to fact sheet HLA-6232 or the instructions located at https://extension.okstate.edu/programs/oklahoma-pecan-management/pecan-leaf-samples-instructions.html . Grapevine petiole sampling procedures can be found at http://www.grapes.okstate.edu/news/july-is-grape-petiole-sampling-time . To sample blackberries, after harvest collect fully matured leaves from midway on the primocane (new vegetative shoots). Sample should be about 60 or more leaves. Rinse them and let dry before submitting in a forage bag.

     

    Results will only be as accurate as the sample collected so it is advised to follow the directions. Once the leaves are sampled, they should be submitted to the local county extension office. The cost for tissue analysis is $20. The extension office will send the samples to the OSU Soil, Water, and Forage Lab. The results will be returned to the extension educator and then shared with the grower. If you need assistance with interpreting the results, please contact me.

     

    Fertilizer recommendations will be provided for the following spring application. Frequently growers find out that they are applying unnecessary nutrients and can reduce their costs of fertilizing. The fee for a leaf sample can be an inexpensive tool to determine shortages or excesses before problems develop.

     

  • Summer is for Fall Harvest - David Hillock, Consumer Horticulturist

    Summer may not seem like the best time to be thinking about a fall garden, but July through September is the time to start planting several vegetable varieties in order to have a fall harvest. Some tender vegetables that can be started in July and August and harvested before fall frosts include beans, cilantro, sweet corn, cucumber, pumpkin, and summer and winter squash. Be sure to choose varieties that mature early and are disease resistant. Some semi-hardy plants, those that may continue to grow and be harvested after several frosts, include beet, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, garlic, leaf lettuce, parsnip, and radish. 

     

    Climatic conditions of July and August involve high soil temperature, high light intensity, and rapid drying of the soil, resulting in an increase in the problems of obtaining a uniform stand of plants. Achieving a full stand of plants in the heat of summer may require special treatments. This might include shade over rows when seeded and supplemental watering to reduce soil temperature and aid in seed germination.

     

    Insects and weeds can be more prevalent this time of year so check frequently for insect activity and weed growth and use appropriate control measures. For more information on planting a fall garden see OSU Extension Fact Sheet HLA-6009 Fall Gardening.

  • Vegetable Tapener - Casey Hentges, Oklahoma Gardening Host and Laura Payne, Assistant Producer, Oklahoma Gardening

    Staking tomatoes and other crops is important as the plants continue to grow.  There are various reasons to provide support to the plants.  Not only does it make the crop easier to harvest, but more importantly, improves the overall health of the plant.  By keeping the plants off the ground, it will reduce exposure to additional pathogens that might splash on the plant from the soil.  It also allows for better air flow around the plants, reducing the potential for fungus and other diseases that often spread in damp environments.  Staking plants also allows the leaves to be exposed to more sunlight.  More sunlight means more photosynthesis, which means more plant growth.

     

    There are several methods to stake plants, and sometimes this can vary depending on the crop being grow.  Metal cages can be used to support the vertical growth of plants.  There is also the stake and weave method where twine is continually weaved around the plants and between stakes in rows as the plants grow taller.  Depending on the crop, something different like guidewires can be used to tie up espalier fruit trees.  Or for a more natural look bamboo stakes can be used in multiple ways to support plants. The latter two methods often require attaching the plant to the support in some form.  Rubber ties or stretchy plastic tape work well to hand tie the plants and are often perfect for a backyard because there are not a lot of plants.  However, there are other options available for staking a lot of plants multiple times a season as they grow.

     

    A tapener or tapetool is a fun tool that helps expedite the staking process.  It is basically a stapler combined with a tape dispenser and is very simple to use.  The large, wide mouth of the tapener is placed around the stem and the trellis at the same time.  While doing this, tape is drawn around the two and when the handle is squeezed, the tape is stapled and cut attaching the plant to the trellis.  While fruits and vegetables often need staking, it can be used to stake any number of plants around the garden such as vines and young trees.

     

    There are many styles, brands, sizes, etc. that vary from consumers to more commercial use.  Depending on the style, they can range anywhere from $20 to $80.  Keep in mind the staples and tape will need to be replaced as it is used.  This tool can turn what may seem like a daunting garden chore into something that is quick and easy.  

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R28mvLeIrYo

  • Oklahoma Native Pecan Chefs' Dinner - Becky Carroll, Associate Extension Specialist

    The Oklahoma Pecan Growers Association (OPGA) is sponsoring the first of 4 chefs’ dinners to be held around the state. These dinners will highlight Oklahoma native pecans. The first fundraiser dinner will be celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Tulsa Farmer’s Market. The July 24 event from 5-8pm will feature chef demonstrations, educational features, libations, live music by Shelby Eicher and friends, and of course delicious food at Mabee Grange at Tulsa Botanic Garden.

     

    The talented chefs will feature native pecans and other Oklahoma grown products in their dishes. Some of the participating chefs include Lisa Becklund, Proprietor Chef of il Seme & FarmBar; Carla Cousins, Chef de Cuisine of The Hemingway Steakhouse; Adams Myers with BurnCo BBQ; Shannon Smith, Personal Chef; & Justin Thompson of Justin Thompson Restaurants.

     

    This event is sponsored by Justin Thompson Restaurant Group & Oklahoma Pecan Growers Association made possible by the Oklahoma Dept. of Agriculture, Food & Forestry, In Partnership with The Tulsa Botanic Garden.  

     

    Funding from the ODAFF Specialty Crop Block Grant will help to increase awareness of native pecans to local and national consumers and to provide Oklahoma landowners with information needed to harness the native agriculture resource.    

    Future dinners will be in support of other 501 c3 organizations around the state. Each dinner will feature chefs preparing dishes showcasing Oklahoma native pecans. This is part of the social media and marketing campaign to raise awareness of Oklahoma native pecans among consumers in Oklahoma. Pecan South, as well as other regional and local press, will be in attendance. This event promotes all Oklahoma native pecans and is not specific to any one farmer. 

     

    Any Oklahoma native grower that retails Oklahoma native pecans or otherwise wishes to support the effort to build and raise awareness of Oklahoma native pecans is invited to buy tickets and join us. For this first dinner, the tickets are $125 each and can be purchased online at www.tulsafarmersmarket.org/events. 

  • July Irrigation - David Hillock, Consumer Horticulturist

    While we have recently received ample amounts of rainfall, eventually it will get drier as the summer continues. Adequate soil moisture is essential for good crop growth. A healthy plant is composed of 75-90% water, which is used for the plant's vital functions, including photosynthesis, support (rigidity), and transportation of nutrients and sugars to various parts of the plant.  

     

    There are several options for applying water to plants. These include: a watering can, a garden hose with a breaker nozzle or spray attachment for containers, small gardens or individual plants and portable lawn sprinklers, a perforated plastic soaker hose, drip or trickle irrigation, or a semi-automatic drip system for lawns and gardens.  

     

    Your careful use of irrigation techniques will help local streams and will ultimately benefit larger bodies of water in your surrounding area by reducing fertilizer and pesticide run-off and by conserving water.

     

    Some Basic Techniques and Principles for Watering

    Adjust the flow or rate of water application to about one-half inch per hour to avoid causing run-off. To determine the rate for a sprinkler, place small tin cans at various places within the sprinkler's reach and check the level of water in the cans at 15-minute intervals.

     

    When using the oscillating type of lawn sprinkler, place the sprinkler on a platform higher than the crop to prevent water from being diverted by plant leaves. Try to keep the watering pattern even by frequently moving the sprinkler and overlapping about one half of each pattern. 

     

    Do not sprinkle foliage in the evening. Wet foliage overnight may encourage disease. Morning watering is preferred. 

     

    Perforated plastic hoses or soaker hoses should be placed with holes down (if there are holes), along one side of the crop row or underneath mulch. Water will slowly soak into the soil.

     

    Frequent, light watering will only encourage shallow rooting, causing plants to suffer more quickly during drought periods, especially if mulches are not used. On the other hand, too much water, especially in poorly drained soils, can be as damaging to plant growth as too little water.

     

    Your lawn can use an inch or more of water per week in hot, dry weather, The lawn should be watered when the soil begins to dry out, but before the grass wilts. loss of resilience can be observed; footprints will make a long-lasting imprint instead of bouncing right back. 

     

    Critical watering periods for selected vegetables are:

    Asparagus: Spear production, fern development

    Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower: Head development

    Beans, Peas: Pod filling

    Carrot: Seed emergence, root development

    Corn: Silking, tasseling, ear development

    Eggplant, Tomato: Flowering, fruiting

    Cucumber, Melon: Flowering, fruit development

    Lettuce: Head development; moisture should be constant

  • Squash Bug Management - David Hillock, Consumer Horticulturist

    When it comes to vegetable pests in Oklahoma, there is nothing more loathed than the dreaded squash bug, Anasa tristis (DeGeer). Below is information about squash bug summarized from OCES Circular E-918: Major Horticultural and Household Insects of Oklahoma.

     

    Description

    Adults are brownish black to dark ashy black and measure about 5/8 inch long. The body is compact and flat across the back with the wings overlapping toward the rear. They give off a disagreeable odor when handled or crushed. Eggs are somewhat diamond- or spindle-shaped and white when first deposited, gradually turning yellowish brown and finally dark bronze. They are laid in loose masses, mostly on the underside of leaves. Newly hatched nymphs are pale green. As they grow, they develop a gray body color with black legs. Nymphs are smaller than adults and do not have wings, but the last two nymphal stages have noticeable wing pads.

     

    Life Cycle

    Squash bugs overwinter as unmated adults under plant debris or other suitable shelter. They emerge in April or May, search for suitable hosts, and mate. Eggs are laid over a period of several weeks, often in the angles formed by leaf veins, and hatch one to two weeks later. Five nymphal stages grow for four to six weeks before new adults are produced. There are three or four generations per year, but due to the extended egg-laying period all stages are present for most of the season. Nymphs present in late fall are killed by freezing temperatures and adults seek overwintering sites.

     

    Hosts

    All cucurbit vine crops are subject to squash bug infestation. The bugs prefer squash, pumpkin, watermelon, cantaloupe, and cucumber, in that order. Hubbard, winter, and marrow squash are often heavily infested.

     

    Damage

    Both nymphs and adults feed by sucking juices from plants. The overwintered adults can cause extensive damage as they appear just after plants have emerged. Feeding can greatly stress and even kill young seedlings. Once the plants attain greater size, they can withstand a moderate number of squash bugs. Nymphs tend to feed in clusters at first but will disperse as they become older. All stages prefer the leaves but will feed on all above-ground plant parts. They may congregate and feed on unripened fruits, especially late in the season. Squash bugs can increase in abundance quite rapidly and can cause plants to wilt due to feeding in large numbers. When combined with hot, dry weather, feeding stress on plants is greatly increased. However, squash bugs will not kill plants “overnight.” If plants wilt and die overnight, one should suspect another causal agent, such as bacterial wilt.

     

    Inspection and Control

    Good cultural practices help prevent serious squash bug damage. Proper fertilization of vines produces a vigorous crop that is better able to withstand insect attack. Squash varieties such as Butternut, Royal Acorn, and Sweet Cheese are less susceptible to infestation than pumpkin or summer squash. Removal and destruction of crop debris after harvest eliminates some of the insects, their late-season hosts, and some potential overwintering sites. In small gardens, adult bugs and leaves with egg masses can be handpicked and destroyed. The bugs can also be trapped by placing small boards near the host vines. Squash bugs gather under the boards at night and can be collected and destroyed the next morning.

     

    Seedlings should be inspected regularly, and treatment applied as soon as adult squash bugs enter the field in spring. If these first insects can be controlled, the late-season population can be greatly reduced due to the presence of fewer eggs. Once plants are established, they should be inspected frequently to detect adult bugs and eggs. Adults spend most of their time within the plant canopy around the stems or on the underside of leaves. They often seek shelter under leaves in contact with the ground. Eggs also are found mostly on the underside of leaves. The key to control is to prevent development of large populations, so chemical treatments should be applied to kill the maximum number of small nymphs.

     

    A study was conducted at Ohio State University in 2005 to compare the effectiveness of several insecticides against squash bug. Treatments consisted of biorational, or environmentally friendly, and conventional insecticides and were targeted against young nymphs, old nymphs, and adults. Interestingly, certain insecticides were more effective on different life stages of squash bug. In other words, the type of product recommended for control varies with the size and developmental stage of the target population. The results of this study are summarized in the table below—trade names for common homeowner products containing these active ingredients are listed after the table.

    Squash bug life stage treatments

    Carbaryl – Sevin

    Cyfluthrin – Bayer Advanced Vegetable & Garden Insect Spray

    Esfenvalerate – Ortho Bug B Gon Max Garden & Landscape Insect Killer

    Lambda-cyhalothrin ***

    Permethrin – Bayer Advanced Vegetable & Garden Insect Dust; Bonide Eight Insect Control Garden Dust

    Pyrethrins – Bonide Tomato & Vegetable Ready to Use; Ferti-lome Quick-Kill Home, Garden & Pet Spray Ready to Use

    Spinosad – Ferti-lome Borer, Bagworm, Leafminer & Tent Caterpillar Spray

    • *** There are no registered homeowner products labeled for squash bug control that contain this active ingredient.
  • Bagworms - David Hillock, Consumer Horticulturist

    Once again, bagworms are popping up here and there. They are commonly found on juniper and arborvitae species, which seems to be some of their favorite plants, though they can be found on several other species as well. I even found several on a small potted bald cypress on my back patio the other day.  

    bagworm on juniper

     

    Bagworms are a species of clear winged moths. The adult male develops into the moth and the female are wingless, have no functional legs, eyes or antennae, are almost maggot-like in appearance and will never leave the bag. The bags are quite tiny right now but will continue to grow as the larvae add fragments of the host plant foliage while they feed. The larvae remain in the bag, moving the bag across the twig as they feed and grow.

     

    Now is the time to control them. Hand picking and destroying each little bag is the most effective way to manage them if you can reach them. If they are out of reach, several pesticides are labeled for control and are quite effective at this very young stage of the insects’ life. If you wait until they get more mature the insecticides used will be less effective.

     

    Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (B.t.), a bacterial insecticide, is reported to provide good control of young bagworms. Also effective are products that contain the active ingredient Spinosad. These insecticides must be ingested by the caterpillars to achieve kill, so be patient as it will take some time to see results. Repeat applications may be needed later in the summer to keep susceptible plants free of bagworms.

     

    Late in the season, large, older larvae are not as susceptible to B.t. and spinosad. Thus, bagworms must be sprayed with broad-spectrum, contact insecticides. Homeowners can look for products containing the active ingredients carbaryl (Sevin) or malathion that are labeled for caterpillar control on ornamental plants. An arborist certified with the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) should be hired to combat bagworm infestations on large trees with tall canopies. Contact your county extension office for assistance with locating an ISA-certified arborist in your area.

     

    Remember, now is the time to control them by either hand picking or applying an insecticide while the worms are small. If not controlled, bagworms can completely defoliate a plant, which usually kills a host plant like juniper. Broadleaf plants are not killed but may be weakened leaving them more susceptible to attack from other pests.

  • Brown Patch Disease of Cool Season Grasses - David Hillock, Consumer Horticulturist

    Brown patch is a disease that commonly shows up on cool season turfgrasses, especially tall fescue, but can occasionally appear on hybrid bermudagrass and zoysiagrass. Brown patch disease appears as brown patches up to three feet in diameter. Leaves first take on a dark color, then wilt and turn brown. 

     

    Brown patch usually occurs in hot, humid weather when night temperatures are above 60o F and foliage remains wet for prolonged periods. Poor soil drainage, lack of air movement, cloudy weather, heavy dew, overwatering and watering in late afternoon favor prolonged leaf wetness and increased disease severity. The application of high rates of nitrogen and or deficiencies of phosphorus and potassium, especially when weather conditions are favorable for brown patch, can increase disease severity. Excessive thatch, mowing when wet and leaf fraying by dull mower blades can also enhance the severity of brown patch.

     

    Control. Control starts with good management practices. Though there are varieties of turf-type tall fescue that are considered resistant to brown patch, even resistant varieties succumb when growing conditions are less than ideal for growth of strong plants (as described above) and environmental conditions are highly favorable for disease development. 

     

    When environmental conditions favor disease, avoid application of excessive rates of nitrogen. Fertilizer should be applied judiciously, and adequate amounts of phosphorus and potassium are essential to ensure the highest possible levels of plant resistance. In general, cool-season turfgrasses should not receive more than one pound of actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet at any one time. Use very low rates or avoid applying nitrogen in late spring or summer to cool-season turfgrasses. In a typical home lawn situation, the last application of fertilizer in the spring should be applied no later than early May. Ensure adequate amounts of phosphorus and potassium by applying these nutrients based on soil test results.

     

    Reduce prolonged leaf wetness by watering infrequently to a depth of 6 to 8 inches and at a time when the foliage is likely to dry quickly. Avoid watering in late afternoon and evening and allow for better air movement by removing unwanted vegetation and selectively pruning trees and shrubs. Removal of morning dew reduces prolonged leaf wetness and exudates that favor disease development. This can be accomplished by dragging a hose across the turfgrass or by running the irrigation system for a short time period. Good surface and soil drainage must be present to reduce disease incidence.

     

    Make sure mower blades are sharp to reduce the amount of wounded turfgrass in which the fungus can enter the plant. Collect and promptly dispose of clippings on infected areas or when conditions favor disease development. Avoid mowing turfgrass when wet, and do not mow too low so that the turfgrass will be better able to resist the disease.

     

    Applications of effective fungicides, when the first disease symptoms appear, will give good control of brown patch on highly maintained turfgrass. A preventative fungicide program should be considered in areas where the above conditions are difficult to control or change and when conditions are favorable for disease development.

     

    For more information on managing cool-season grasses see leaflet L-442 Cool-Season Lawn Management Calendar and fact sheet HLA-6420 Lawn Management in Oklahoma

  • Dividing and Replanting Iris - David Hillock, Consumer Horticulturist

    Irises are relatively carefree, easy to grow and long-lived perennials; however, they should be divided every three to four years when they become crowded. Crowded iris will begin to decline in growth and will have fewer and smaller flowers.

     

    Divide the rhizomes (underground stems) after the plants have flowered; July through August is the best time to do this in Oklahoma. Throw away any segments that are diseased, riddled with insects, or small and weak. Separate healthy rhizomes into segments with one fan of leaves and several roots. Cut the leaves back to six inches. When planting the new plant, spread the roots out in the soil and position the top of the rhizome at the soil surface. If planted too deep they will not flower as well and are more susceptible to disease and insect attack.

  • Injury Prevention Tips for Gardening - David Hillock, Consumer Horticulturist

    Using common sense and joint/muscle protection techniques can help minimize potential injury or overuse of our hands and arms. 

     

    Gardening, a common summertime activity, can cause repetitive injuries if not done correctly. It is important to take precautions to avoid injuries. Gardening is made up of many repetitive activities such as weeding, digging, raking, lifting, gripping, stooping, squatting, etc. The nature of these activities places the avid gardener at higher risk for injury than those with a more stationary hobby. For those who work full time and garden in their off time, the risk of injury is even greater since the body doesn’t have time to recover between activities.

     

    The repetitive nature of gardening places stress on the hands, wrists, elbows, neck, back, hips, knees and ankles. Poor posture and awkward positions only increase the stress to the body. Using proper ergonomics, good posture and performing warm up exercises prior to gardening can help prevent injuries. 

     

    There are numerous ergonomic tools for gardening available at home and garden stores and online. These tools are designed to place less stress on the body during use, thus, helping to prevent injuries. For the do-it-yourselfer, tool handles can be built up using padded tape or foam pipe insulation. Another alternative is to wear padded gloves like those used by bikers or weightlifters. Any of these options will increase traction for gripping, decrease the amount of muscle force needed to grip, and decrease the stress and strain on the joints. Tools ideal for padding include rakes, shovels, trowels, pruning shears, and spray nozzles. 

     

    Periodic maintenance of tools can lessen the chance of injury. Shovels, hoes, trowels, and pruning shears require less muscle force to use if kept sharp. Tools with moving parts should be lubricated. Simple modifications to help prevent injuries include:

    • Stretch before and after gardening
    • Change position frequently
    • Keep work as close to your body as possible
    • Avoid reaching
    • Use light weight equipment
    • Use step stools or ladders to avoid reaching overhead
    • Use two hands when possible
    • Avoid twisting the forearm
    • Keep elbows slightly bent
    • Avoid overexertion
    • Keep wrists in neutral
    • Avoid a tight sustained grip
    • Take short breaks every hour
    • Bend from knees instead of from your back
    • Keep back straight
    • Rotate activities
    • Use padding under the knees when kneeling

    If, despite your best efforts, you get a sprain or strain, use the “RICE” principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). Once injured, it is important to limit aggravating activities to avoid making the injury worse. If symptoms persist, your doctor may recommend a brace, prescribe an anti-inflammatory, and/or make a referral for physical or occupational therapy.

     

  • Brown Patch Disease of Cool-Season Grasses - David Hillock, Consumer Horticulturist

    Brown patch is a disease that commonly shows up on cool-season turfgrasses, especially tall fescue, but can occasionally appear on hybrid bermudagrass and zoysiagrass. Brown patch disease appears as brown patches up to three feet in diameter. Leaves first take on a dark color, then wilt and turn brown. 

     

    Brown patch usually occurs in hot, humid weather when night temperatures are above 60°F and foliage remains wet for prolonged periods. Poor soil drainage, lack of air movement, cloudy weather, heavy dew, overwatering and watering in late afternoon favor prolonged leaf wetness and increased disease severity. The application of high rates of nitrogen and or deficiencies of phosphorus and potassium, especially when weather conditions are favorable for brown patch, can increase disease severity. Excessive thatch, mowing when wet and leaf fraying by dull mower blades can also enhance the severity of brown patch.

     

    Control starts with good management practices. Though there are varieties of turf-type tall fescue that are considered resistant to brown patch, even resistant varieties succumb when growing conditions are less than ideal for growth of strong plants (as described above) and environmental conditions are highly favorable for disease development. 

     

    When environmental conditions favor disease, avoid application of excessive rates of nitrogen. Fertilizer should be applied judiciously, and adequate amounts of phosphorus and potassium are essential to ensure the highest possible levels of plant resistance. In general, cool-season turfgrasses should not receive more than one pound of actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet at any one time. Use very low rates or avoid applying nitrogen in late spring or summer to cool-season turfgrasses. In a typical home lawn situation, the last application of fertilizer in the spring should be applied no later than early May. Ensure adequate amounts of phosphorus and potassium by applying these nutrients based on soil test results.

     

    Reduce prolonged leaf wetness by watering infrequently to a depth of 6 to 8 inches and at a time when the foliage is likely to dry quickly. Avoid watering in late afternoon and evening and allow for better air movement by removing unwanted vegetation and selectively pruning trees and shrubs. Removal of morning dew reduces prolonged leaf wetness and exudates that favor disease development. This can be accomplished by dragging a hose across the turfgrass or by running the irrigation system for a short time period. Good surface and soil drainage must be present to reduce disease incidence.

     

    Make sure mower blades are sharp to reduce the amount of wounded turfgrass in which the fungus can enter the plant. Collect and promptly dispose of clippings on infected areas or when conditions favor disease development. Avoid mowing turfgrass when wet, and do not mow too low so that the turfgrass will be better able to resist the disease.

     

    Applications of effective fungicides, when the first disease symptoms appear, will give good control of brown patch on highly maintained turfgrass. A preventative fungicide program should be considered in areas where the above conditions are difficult to control or change and when conditions are favorable for disease development.

     

    For more information on managing cool-season grasses see leaflet L-442 Cool-Season Lawn Management Calendar and fact sheet HLA-6420 Lawn Management in Oklahoma

     

  • Pecan Growers Host Annual Meeting in Ardmore - Becky Carroll, Associate Extension Specialist

    Over 200 pecan growers from all over Oklahoma and many surrounding states attended the 2022 Oklahoma Pecan Growers Convention and Trade Show on June 9-11 in Ardmore. Many thanks to all our speakers and especially vendors. Thanks to Keegan Varner, Tayler Denman, Erin Hubbard and Carla Smith for their assistance with the event.

     

    The Field Day at Hauani Creek Pecans near Madill was well attended and a great chance to tour the Savage Family pecan orchard. Topics included tree thinning, scab prevention, irrigation and how to plant a pecan tree.

     

    The 2021 State Pecan Show winners were announced during the banquet on Friday evening. Top award winners were:

    Best of Show - Ray Purdy, Kay County exhibited a Pawnee with 59% kernel & 42.3 nuts/lb

    Champion Native - Marilyn Shrick, Tillman County sample was 56.6 % kernel & 56.8 nuts/lb

    Largest Pecan - Dick Hoffman, Payne County exhibited Pawnee with 36.6 nuts/lb

    Highest % Kernel - Jim Lavendusky, Tulsa County exhibited a Forkert with 62.9% kernel

     

    Other special awards presented went to:

    Herman Hinrichs Award – Niels Maness, Oklahoma State University

    Grower of the Year – Jimmy Carroll, Cimarron Valley Research Station

    Grove of the Year – Flying G Ranch, Sapulpa, OK

     

    A special award was presented to OPGA President Bob Knight for all the work he has done to procure grant funds to promote Oklahoma native pecans and other grant projects.

     

    Photos of the events can be found on the @Oklahomapecans Facebook page.

 

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