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Whether it's your pine tree that is looking sick or your wheat crop that is stunted and yellow in low-lying areas, we are here to help solve your plant disease problems.

 

The primary goal of the Plant Disease and Insect Diagnostic Laboratory (PDIDL) is to provide residents in the State of Oklahoma with both accurate diagnoses of plant diseases and insect pests and recommendations for their control. The PDIDL operates throughout the year to provide plant disease and insect identification services to extension agents, individuals, consultants, and commercial producers. To see how receive a diagnosis, refer to the section on "Sample Collection".

 

The mission of the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service is to disseminate and encourage the adaptation of research-generated knowledge relating to agriculture, home economics, rural development, and 4-H youth development to the residents of Oklahoma.

 

  • What is the PDIDL?

    Whether it's your pine tree that is looking sick or your wheat crop that is stunted and yellow in low-lying areas, we are here to help solve your plant disease problems.

     

    The primary goal of the Plant Disease and Insect Diagnostic Laboratory (PDIDL) is to provide residents in the State of Oklahoma with both accurate diagnoses of plant diseases and insect pests and recommendations for their control. The PDIDL operates throughout the year to provide plant disease and insect identification services to extension agents, individuals, consultants, and commercial producers. To see how receive a diagnosis, refer to the section on "Sample Collection" below.

     

    The mission of the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service is to disseminate and encourage the adaptation of research-generated knowledge relating to agriculture, home economics, rural development, and 4-H youth development to the residents of Oklahoma.

  • Services

    The PDIDL strives to provide both accurate and timely diagnosis of the samples received. All samples received in the lab are examined for plant disease based on symptoms and the presence or absence of pathogens (microorganisms that cause disease). Diagnostic replies are sent by mail and include a diagnosis, recommendations for control, and supplemental information when available.

     

    Many of the problems people see in their plants, both in commercial production or in the landscape, are caused by environmental problems or improper care and are not infectious diseases. In these cases, it may be impossible for the PDIDL to determine the cause for certain, since no pathogen can be isolated and identified. For a list of services the PDIDL cannot provide, see below.

     

    Services Available

    • Diagnosis of most infectious plant diseases.
    • Isolation and identification of nematodes from soil.
    • Isolation and identification of nematodes from roots.
    • Determination of the disease problem and recommendations for its management.

     

    Service Fees Per Sample

    • $0.00 (Currently no charge) - General insect diagnosis via digital diagnostics.
    • $0.00 (Currently no charge) - General disease diagnosis via digital diagnostics w/no sample.
    • $10.00 - General disease diagnosis and recommendations (includes pine wilt nematodes).
    • $25.00 - Viral disease identification using ELISA.
    • $30.00 - Nematode extraction (soil and/or roots), identification, enumeration, and recommendations.
    • $35.00 - Rose rosette virus testing using rt-PCR method (see note above about out-of-state samples).
    • $35.00 (by arrangement only) - Disease or insect identification using DNA or RNA based test methods.

     

    Services Not Provided

    • Identification of molds or bacteria in soil, water, or air.
    • Identification or isolation of plant pathogens from soil, water, or air.
    • Positive identification of certain bacteria and viruses.
    • Identification or screening for pesticide resistant plant pathogens.
    • Identification of strain, race, mating type, pathovar or Anastomosis Group of pathogens.
    • Isolation or identification of human or animal pathogens.
    • Disease identification from dead or decomposing plants (with a few exceptions).
    • Pesticide residue determinations.
    • Plant tissue or soil nutrient analysis.
    • Species identification of most pathogen isolates.
    • Mushroom identification.
    • Plant Identification.
  • Sample Collection

    Collecting Plant Samples

    • Collect several plant specimens showing various stages of disease development. Select plants that are still alive.
    • Collect the entire plant whenever possible. Plants should be dug (not pulled) to keep the roots intact.
    • For tree samples, the branches sent in should be at least 8 inches long.

     Example of how to collecting plant sample.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Plant Sample Packaging

    1. First, wrap the roots of the plant in a plastic bag so that they do not dry out. If the plant is already potted then it can be left in the pot for shipping.
    2. Second, wrap the entire sample in plant bags to keep it from drying out (exceptions: wrap fleshy fruits beginning to decay and mushrooms in newspaper). 
    3. Third, place the plant in a sturdy box or mailing tube. Do not add water or wet paper towels. Send a detailed history explaining the disease symptoms, when disease began, name, address, and phone number. Take it to your county Cooperative Extension Office to have it shipped or send it directly to the lab address below by first class mail.
    Wrap the roots of the plant in a plastic bag so that they do not dry out.

     Wrap the entire sample in plant bags to keep it from drying out.



     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Collecting Soil Samples

    • Take several soil samples in an area showing possible nematode damage. Collect the soil at a depth where the root concentration is the greatest (1-12 inches). Mix the samples from the area.
    • Remove a single 1 pint sample for nematode analysis.

     

    Soil Sample Packaging

    • Place soil in a non-vented plastic bag. Label the bag with collection date, location, and crop. Mail first class in a sturdy box or take it to your county Cooperative Extension Office to have it shipped.

     

    Sample Submission

  • Plant Disease or Insect Diagnostic Request Form

    To request service please fill out a Plant Disease or Insect Diagnostic Request Form  and submit it with the sample to the lab. Our laboratory currently does not charge additional fees for out-of-state (OOS) testing and a check made out to "Oklahoma State University" should be included with the sample. Please note that OOS samples must be submitted in double plastic bags. 

 

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